Lens-Artists Challenge #132 – Striped & Checked

[Categories: Photography, Photography 101 Forever]

Per A-C: “We find Striped and Checked everywhere around us, but maybe this is so common a pattern that we don’t notice it if we don’t go looking for it?”

I love her opening quote:

Once you can accept the universe as matter expanding into nothing that is something, wearing stripes with plaid comes easy. – Albert Einstein

My kind of dresser! “Every girl’s crazy ’bout a sharp-dressed man!” –ZZ Top

I entered ’stripe’ and ‘check’ in the search function of my Apple Photo library and came up with… NOTHING. So much for A.I. – artificial intelligence. ‘Strip’, not stripe, came up with some good lookin’ steaks! How did those get there?! 🙂

I have some ideas for ‘checked’, but I’ll save those for a possible Part 2. Here are some stripes in nature, in photos I took over the last few days near Breckenridge, CO.

Nothing says vertical stripes, in my opinion, like TREES! This shot was taken with my iPhone:

On the iPhone X the sky came out a rich, dark blue, with nearly-gold aspen trees.

It was a very bright, sunny day.

“It’s gonna be a bright (bright)
Bright (bright) sunshiny day”
— I Can See Clearly Now (various artists) written by Johnny Nash

 Compare the previous to my ZS-200 camera:

This was in Std mode, as my favored Vivid mode was tending toward blue snow (bumping exposure in Vivid made the sky wash out). Camera was on P-Program, Std, ISO 125, F3.5, S/S 1000, Exp +-0. It looks like it looked!

Vertical stripes of trees follow, in the same area (Colorado Trail, Kenosha Pass, Hwy 285):

The snow looks a bit blue. Camera was on P-Program, Vivid mode this time, ISO 125, F4.0, S/S 800, Exp +1 1/3.

Stripes of shadow cross ‘the road less traveled’. (Boreas Pass Road, outside Breckenridge, CO.)

Same road, a little sunnier on the way back down:

Lastly, are those STRIPES on the mechanical man? Hmm. But is it ART?! Beauty… in the eye of… etc. 🙂

Remember, when all else fails: ‘Dance like no one is watching!’

Stay safe, be well, be kind to one another.

HAVE A GREAT 2021.

41 thoughts on “Lens-Artists Challenge #132 – Striped & Checked

  1. Well, I am perfectly satisfied with your beautiful stripes as trees or trees as stripes! Glad you did not provide us with strips and steaks…And ZZ Top is totally right. 😀 My son is living up to that…unfortunately so is not my husband.
    Love your angles/perspectives – I was so convinced they were birch trees! Aspen? And WHY did the mechanical man walk out in the forest? Without proper clothing it is just natural he got rusty…

    Looking forward to your checks!

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Ha ha! Thank you A-C. Yes, aspen. Colorado is loaded with them. To quote: “Aspen is another of Colorado’s extensive forest types, covering 5 million acres or 20 percent of the state’s forested land. Aspen, known as quaking aspen, are Colorado’s only widespread, native, deciduous tree and can be found from 6,500 to 11,500 feet in elevation, particularly on the West Slope.” And remember, ‘rust never sleeps!’ 🙂

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  2. Loved your trees this week John, especially the comparison between your phone vs camera results. I think the camera did a better job reflecting reality but both are beautiful. I love the aspens (isn’t that what they are? or are they birch?) as we have none (of either) here in the south. And as always your musical references are perfect. Terrific response.

    Liked by 1 person

    1. Thank you Tina. Yes, aspens. “Aspen is another of Colorado’s extensive forest types, covering 5 million acres or 20 percent of the state’s forested land. Aspen, known as quaking aspen, are Colorado’s only widespread, native, deciduous tree and can be found from 6,500 to 11,500 feet in elevation, particularly on the West Slope.” They provide all of our indigenous fall colors.

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  3. Thank you Tina. Yes, aspens. “Aspen is another of Colorado’s extensive forest types, covering 5 million acres or 20 percent of the state’s forested land. Aspen, known as quaking aspen, are Colorado’s only widespread, native, deciduous tree and can be found from 6,500 to 11,500 feet in elevation, particularly on the West Slope.” They provide all of our indigenous fall colors.

    Like

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